Robot Of Sherwood Review

I’ve always loved Robin Hood, and the various assorted takes on the character.  Apparently, so does Clara.  There’s just something about the take from the rich and give to the poor thing that makes us want to love him.  From the first appearance of Robin Hood in Robot of Sherwood, I liked him.

My husband (who doesn’t even watch Doctor Who), was laughing from the get go.

The arrow scene between the Doctor and Robin Hood was when the action really started though.  Robots?  Hmmm…  At this point I was hoping this wouldn’t be just a filler episode.  It was, but I really did enjoy it.  It was just one of those fun episodes that are a joy to watch if you don’t get too picky about them.  I’m sure I will on the second viewing, but I’ve only seen it once so far.

Clara was in fine form in my opinion (although she was really doughy-eyed).  Maybe it was just me, but I felt like the writing for her was much better in this episode.  She got to be smarter and have more fun.  I’m certain it had something to do with Mark Gatiss.  I also love “cranky Doctor”.  His interactions with other people are fantastic!  He can insight a riot like no one else, and make you super excited in the process.

So when I first saw the robots, I was expecting Cybermen.  I think I was disappointed to see just robots.  There wasn’t much information, and no real backstory, but that’s what you get in a filler episode.  I found them disposed of rather quickly, but I’m sure that was due to time constraints.  I felt that it was made up for with the sword fighting and the banter.  It was definitely made up for in the final chat between Robin Hood and the Doctor.  The Doctor needed that, and he made up for being such a jerk in the end.

We didn’t get an appearance from Missy this time, but we did get a reference to the promised land… definitely going to be our series arc this time around.

Did you like it?  I’d love to hear your opinions!

Gatiss On Capaldi’s First Episode

From Digital Spy:

Mark Gatiss has promised an “exciting” and “disturbing” debut for Peter Capaldi on Doctor Who.

Speaking to Digital Spy at the London Lesbian & Gay Switchboard 40th Anniversary Gala last night, Gatiss spoke about writing for Doctor Who series eight.

“Peter has a very different energy to Matt Smith and to David Tennant,” he said. “He’s older which changes everything – it’s amazing what a change does!

“Matt was sublime and I was very sorry to see him go, but it’s also great to have a change – as it has always been with the Doctor.”

Gatiss added that Capaldi’s new Doctor brings with him “a whole new set of rules”.

“The Doctor’s always the Doctor – but you can have a lot of fun playing with people’s expectations,” he continued. “Everyone knows how the previous Doctor would react in any given situation – and now you just don’t know!”

Steven Moffat has written Capaldi’s first full Doctor Who episode, which Gatiss described as “thrilling”.

The sci-fi drama will return to BBC One later in 2014, with Sherlock‘s Steve Thompson also among the confirmed writers for the latest run.

Doctor Who Live: The Afterparty

After the 50th aired, there was an “after-party” show.

I haven’t found a link to the whole thing, but here’s a clip where they tried to talk to One Direction live:

For what reason they wanted to talk to them, I have no idea.  But this was terrible.  I have to give credit where credit was due – Matt Smith fielded a horrible question quite wonderfully.  Aside from them (the show-runners themselves) just not knowing enough to give up, we were also subjected to one of the boys readjusting himself on camera.  Seriously?  Poor Steven Moffat had his head in his hands.  He looked horrified, and rightly so.

On a side note, I’m rather impressed to see that Matt Smith shares my affection for crazy socks.

There were a number of technical glitches during the show, some more glaring than others.  All in all, some of it was pretty painful to watch.  At the same time, it was nice to see some former Doctors and all of those companions.  I understand there’s a link where you can watch it if you’re in the UK (I’m not) so that’s an option for you if you’d like to try.

Oh, and I’ve seen a few other reviews of the show… and mine is really nice in comparison.

Mark Gatiss Talks An Adventure In Space And Time

I’m really trying to not repeat anything here, but there’s so much of it that it’s easy to forget what I’ve posted.  I apologize if I double up on anything!

Bradley and Gatiss

TARDIS Tour

I love that Mark Gatiss is such a fan-boy.  He gave Doctor Who TV a tour of the TARDIS, Time Lord style:

“I haven’t been in Paris since the Massacre of the Huguenots” jokes Mark Gatiss, as he steps through the massive, roundel-covered doors of the First Doctor’s TARDIS “Or was it 1979?”.

It’s a muggy July afternoon, and we’re standing in the deafeningly loud convention hall of Paris Comic-Con, where the exquisite replica of the original console room, recreated for An Adventure in Space and Time has received its first public viewing. For those less-well versed in pre-2005 Doctor Who, Mark’s Parisian quips refer to the events of 1966 adventure The Massacre of St Bartholemew’s Eve, and the series’ first overseas filming trip in the French capital for City of Death in 1979.

For writer and executive producer Mark Gatiss, the creation of An Adventure in Space and Time has been “long dreamed of” – initially pitched for Doctor Who’s 40th anniversary in 2003. David Bradley, Jessica Raine, Brian Cox and Sacha Dhawan star, but another undeniable star of the 90-minute drama is the breathtakingly realised console room – which Mark was kind enough to give us a tour around.

Although he’s been working on the drama for some time, Mark still seems to find a huge, childish excitement in the prop. As he clambers under the barrier, he yells “It’s all mine!”, to the hilarity of the crowd of Sonic-waving fans. Do not underestimate the power of roundels, ping pong balls and peppermint green paint (the correct shade, painstakingly sourced using an old BBC design book).

“Incredibly, this console contains a portion of the ashes of Bernard Wilkie” grins Mark ghouslishly, jabbing his index finger onto a pair of Dymo labels on the console that bear the words “BERNARD WILKIE” and “1920-2002”. Wilkie was a pioneer in visual effects at the BBC, working on shows as diverse as Quatermass and Monty Python – and, of course, Doctor Who.

Beyond fitting memorials, the console is “recreated in impeccable detail”. There’s the misread radiation detector from the end of An Unearthly Child, dials and gauges in Megacycles and Phase Shifts, and a twinkling “Year-ometer”.

The accuracy even extends to the myriad flickering bulbs, with Mark joking that they were hot enough to burn one’s hand (as Frazer Hines [Jamie] does in The Web of Fear episode one). The console’s minder later tells me they’ve now been replaced with safer and more energy efficient LEDs.

Mark’s own childhood memories of the Third Doctor seem to shine through, when he spots a favourite console gadget. “Most importantly, these are the things that Jon Pertwee leans on when he revives himself in Planet of the Daleks!” he exclaims, leaning Pertwee-style, on the telepathic circuits and sending a quick message to the Time Lords.

We leave Mark adjusting the lateral balance cones. “I can never remember which is the door switch” he confesses. After a short search, Mark finds it. “Ah yes” he Hartnells, grabbing his lapels and flicking the control. “That is it!”.

Happy Birthday Mark Gatiss!

MarkGatiss